No Regrets for These Former Owners

Mike1We bring you another excellent article written by Denis M. Brown from Pace Capital Resources, LLC.  It is from The Exit Planning Review newsletter, issue 281, dated May 20, 2014.  No Regrets for These Former Owners

Sincerely,

Mike

 

For more information regarding this or any other business planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Musings from the CEO (Fall 2013)

Mike_Hoffman_17Here’s a dire prediction. You will remember 2013 as the year your taxes really went up! There has been a perfect storm of tax law changes that take effect in 2013, combined with the expiration of a number of recession tax relief measures, and the general prognosis that earnings and investment income are finally moving up in 2013 and into 2014.

In 2011 and 2012, those of you with earned income noticed a reduction in your Social Security withholding from 6.2% to 4.2%. That reduction is gone for 2013. You will also notice a Medicare tax increase of .9% that kicks in on earned income for those married taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $200,000 for single taxpayers and $250,000 for married filing joint. This was part of Obamacare.

Also related to Medicare is a new Obamacare tax on net investment income, which includes capital gains (even taxable gain on the sale of a personal residence) of an additional 3.8% for those individual taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of over $200,000 and married taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of over $250,000.

The personal exemption phase outs (PEP) were eliminated during the recession over the last several years, but come back for 2013. This means that the deduction you would normally get for personal exemptions is phased out again, starting for those with adjusted gross income of over $250,000 for individual taxpayers or $300,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

Similarly, the limitations on itemized deductions, which had been suspended over the last several years, come back with a vengeance in 2013. These so-called Pease limitations reduce your itemized deductions up to 80% starting with individual taxpayers with adjusted gross income exceeding $250,000 or married taxpayers with adjusted gross income of over $300,000.

The threshold or floor for deducting medical expenses has been increased by 33 1/3% for 2013. In 2012, qualified medical expenses in excess of 7½% of adjusted gross income were deductible as an itemized deduction, and that threshold/floor has been increased to 10% for 2013.

Tax rates in general have gone up as a result of legislation taking effect in 2013. The top individual income tax rate has increased from 35% to 39.6%. The dividends and capital gains tax rate has increased by 1/3 from 15% in 2012 to 20% in 2013.

The Social Security wage base increased from 2012 to 2013 up to $113,700. That is the amount of earned income which is subject to the Social Security tax of 6.2% for an employee or 12.4% on earnings considered as from self employment.

What does all this mean? Tax rates on earned income have increased from potentially 52.1% (46.1% federal income tax, social security, Medicare, and 6% Georgia) to 61.8% (55.8% federal income tax, social security, Medicare, Obamacare and 6% Georgia). That’s 18.6% increase, and that’s the best scenario. Dividends and capital gains tax has increased 41.9%, from 21% (15% federal, 6% Georgia) to 29.8% (20% federal, 3.8% Obamacare, 6% Georgia).

Primarily, it means get your year-end planning done soon to mitigate any surprises. The need and the benefit of accelerating deductions or deferring income could be the most significant you have ever witnessed. Caution is advised to determine if you are in an alternative minimum tax situation, as this will have a significant effect on some year-end tax maneuvers that you might employ.

Examine your withholding and estimated payments to determine that you have eliminated or minimized any under-payment penalty. Explore the use of a plethora of state tax credits that are available, particularly in Georgia, to pay your state taxes. This could result in saving anywhere from 10% to 40% of your state tax liability, combined with the elimination of any potential under payment penalties.

Most tax preparers have software available to run a mock-up of your 2013 tax returns. This could come in handy to guide you as to whether it is advisable for you to accelerate certain deductions, harvest some capital losses to offset capital gains, convert traditional IRA assets to Roth IRAs, or confirm that your judgment to do nothing is rational.

In addition to being a full service law firm, Hoffman & Associates maintains a stand-alone tax practice area dedicated to the preparation and filing of all types of tax returns. Please do not hesitate to contact me or any of us if we can arrange to assist you in achieving some significant income tax savings for 2013.

For more information regarding this or any other estate or tax planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Sopranos Star’s Will Creates Windfall for IRS

James Gandolfini, the actor best known for his years as Mob boss, Tony Soprano, on HBO’s The Sopranos, died of a massive heart attack at age 51 in June.  The actor’s unexpected death leaves estate planners wondering if Mr. Gandolfini had any legal advice when making his Last Will and Testament, as the largest stakeholder of his estate will be the U.S. Government.

Gandolfini’s Will leaves 80% of his estate to be split equally among his two sisters and his infant daughter.  The remaining 20% is payable to his wife. Though a formal inventory is not due to be filed in the New York Courts until later this year, most estimate Gandolfini’s estate to be worth approximately $70 million.  That sounds like everyone gets a nice piece of the pie, but the government gets first bite.  The New York and U.S. government’s combined share is up to 55%, meaning the IRS could get approximately $25 million.  While Gandolfini’s wife’s 20% share is not subject to such taxes, her portion is determined after taxes are paid, leaving her with about $9,000,000.

The IRS’ share is to be paid in cash, and it is due within 9 months of death.  Gandolfini, like many wealthy celebrities, has mostly illiquid assets.  So, his family will likely be forced to sell certain assets to meet this tax liability.

The lesson here is that tax planning could have saved the Gandolfini family millions.  Assets pass tax free to spouses, so there were ample planning opportunities for a marital trust.  Gandolfini could have taken advantage of gifting strategies during his lifetime to reduce the size of his taxable estate.  A Revocable Trust could have been created to avoid the public knowing these details of his estate plan.  And, the property left to his infant daughter could have been placed in trust so she does not receive her entire inheritance in one lump sum upon attaining age 21.

 Alas, we are only left to wonder if this estate plan meets Gandolfini’s wishes.  With such a disproportionate amount of his estate being distributed to the IRS versus his wife and two children, it leaves an unsettling feeling that he just didn’t get the right plan in place before his untimely death.

For more information regarding estate planning, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Musings from the CEO (Spring 2013)

Estate Planning has evolved significantly over the last several years.  In recent months, we have seen the estate tax exemption become “permanent” at $5,250,000 per person, and it will continue to adjust with inflation.  We have also seen the lifetime gift tax exemption and generation-skipping transfer tax exemption be permanently increased to keep pace with the “new” estate tax exemption.  An obvious effect of this development is that a significant number of estates will be able to pass to the next generation without transfer taxes.  A married couple can now pass at least $10,500,000 of wealth to their children before their estates are hit with the still significant 40% tax rate.

Congress has also made “portability” permanent, which means that any unused exemption when the first spouse dies is carried over to the estate of the surviving spouse.  Prudent planning generally does not rely on portability, since it is sabotaged by the subsequent marriage of the surviving spouse and does not apply to generation-skipping transfer tax.

The focus of seasoned estate planning techniques will continue for the more wealthy.  Estate planning should become less costly and complicated for most Americans, however, Hoffman & Associates will still focus on a significant use of dynasty trusts for a plethora of reasons.  These include not only potential estate tax savings, but also income tax flexibility, asset protection from creditors, preservation of family wealth in the bloodline, protection from divorce, and simplifying probate.  Dynasty trusts, however, are under scrutiny and threat as the Obama Administration pushes its agenda.  While most states are extending the period of time that trusts can hold property, there are proposals to limit that duration for transfer tax (and other?) purposes.

Joe Nagel’s article in this Newsletter is a good reminder to us of the many reasons for estate planning, most of which are not focused on taxes.  We want to be good stewards of our assets.

At Hoffman & Associates our practice will continue to focus on estate planning techniques and working with clients to accomplish their estate planning objectives, with significant focus on succession planning for family businesses and asset protection.

We are seeing an increased focus on elder law matters.  As our client base gets older and the imminent demographics of the country are affected by the baby boomers and their parents, medical technology and a focus on general health issues constantly increase our life expectancies.

As income tax rates continue increasing, we are witnessing a rekindling of our clients’ focus on income tax planning.  This is “back to the basics” for a tax planning firm like Hoffman & Associates.  We continue to focus on important decisions about retirement plans, social security, tax deductions, and the tax sensitive nature of investments on behalf of our clients.

Kim Hoipkemier’s article this month highlights a focus area of Hoffman & Associates, namely, Estate Planning for Women.  Again, demographics, the economy, education and corporate America recognizes that women continue to live longer, earn more, and prosper, with the ever increasing responsibility to juggle and manage family and wealth.

Finally, at Hoffman & Associates we have begun a new area of service for our clients, as their situations demand new and flexible assistance to help them manage their daily financial lives.  The Hoffman Family Office (HFO) services include record keeping, bill paying, bookkeeping, budgeting, investment analysis, insurance analysis/shopping, and family philanthropy matters.  Whether it is the overwhelmed widow, the busy corporate executive, or the family that wants to responsibly out-source some of their financial tedium to their trusted advisors, we want to fill the vacuum by providing such help from the Firm they have trusted with so many other important areas of their planning and financial well-being.  Carolina Gomez of our office has been busy defining the areas where HFO can make a difference, and is ready to talk to you about any area you think HFO may be of assistance.

These are interesting times, and I choose to believe we are at the beginning of good times.  While we are clawing out of a recession, and Washington, DC has us constantly on pins and needles, the economy is generally getting better, unemployment is generally not increasing, and our clients generally are in an upswing in their attitudes and well-beings.  We want to be here for those who need assistance, whether it is planning for them or an elderly family member, assisting with the growth and success of their business, or simply to put their mind at ease that they have satisfactorily addressed planning considerations within their realm of influence.  Let us hear from you!

 

 

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

55K IRS Penalty Abatement

H&A recently obtained an abatement of $55k of late filing and late payment penalties owed by a taxpayer.  The penalties were assessed for tax years 2006 and 2007, and the taxes were not paid until 2010.  

We cannot guaranty abatement of penalties, and success or failure of any request for abatement of penalties depends on the facts and circumstances of each individual case.  If you need help dealing with the IRS, please do not hesitate to contact us at (404) 255-7400.