Even Young People Need Estate Planning

Kim 1“If I don’t have any assets, and I would want everything to go back to my parents anyway, why in the world do I need a Will at 20?”

As they pack their bags and stock up on under-bed boxes for college, the last thing on your college-age kids’ mind is an estate plan.  Even as they don the graduation cap and gown, an estate plan doesn’t even make a blip on their radar.  Perhaps the checklist for adulthood is replete with tasks more important than a Will, but a simple, even bare-bones estate plan should absolutely make the list.

Here’s a possible scenario:  your adult child has an accident and is hospitalized while in college.  You arrive at the hospital only to discover you are not entitled to see his medical records.  If he is unconscious and cannot give you verbal authorization, you’re in the dark, and may not even be able to participate in his health care decisions. Most parents are shocked when they hear this.

The good news is Health Care Powers of Attorney are simple, straightforward and standardized forms giving you the peace of mind you need to make informed decisions based on access to their full medical records.  Click on the following link to access the Georgia Advanced Directive for Healthcare.

After you get the Healthcare Directive in place, consider talking to your child about a Will.  The significance of such a document is often overlooked by a young adult.  Without a Will, a person’s assets will pass according to the State’s instruction.  While this may not be terrible, a parent who has transferred assets to their children may not want those assets back if such transfers were part of a larger estate plan.  In addition, young adults may have more financial assets than they think.  Custodial accounts constitute a significant sum of assets held by young adults.  Finally, consider a digital assets power in both a Will and a General Durable Power of Attorney for your young adults.  Vast amounts of information and access to accounts and other assets are now stored in the cloud.  Getting access to these digital files can be more difficult than you think without an explicit grant of power from your child in a written document.

When your kids come home for Thanksgiving with laundry that weighs more than your turkey dinner, have the conversation about getting these simple documents in place.  We are here to answer any questions you, or your young adult, may have.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Wills – Don’t Be “Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish”

Brusco PhotoWe are all self-sufficient and believe we have the answers to everything.  Why hire a lawyer to draft your Will when you can just do it online and save some money?

Oh, the caution from the courts!  A recent decision (just a month ago) from the Florida Supreme Court, Aldrich v. Basile, No. SC11-2147 (Fla., March 27, 2014), tells us all do not do it alone!

In Aldrich, Ms. Ann Aldrich prepared her Will using the “E-Z Legal Form”.  She left a list of belongings to her sister, then to her brother if her sister predeceased her.  Ms. Aldrich’s sister did, in fact, predecease her and left Ms. Aldrich an inheritance of cash and land.  The “uh-oh” moment came because Ms. Aldrich never revised her Will to bequeath this inheritance of cash and land to anyone, even though she had meticulously spelled out what her sister and, subsequently, her brother were to receive.  In addition, there was no clause in the “E-Z” Will to dispose of the “… after-acquired property or any other property not mentioned in the [W]ill…”.  Guess what happened to the inheritance without a “residuary clause” in the Will?  Only after expensive litigation could Ms. Aldrich’s inheritance from her sister and any other unspecified assets pass via Florida’s intestacy statute (the law that says who gets what when you die without a Will).  The Florida Supreme Court wrote:  “Ms. Aldrich expressed no intent as to any property that she may have acquired after the execution of her Will, as the document did not include a residuary clause, nor did it include any general bequests that could encompass the inherited property.”  Aldrich at *10.  As a result, nieces whom she had not included in her “E-Z” Will received all of the “residue” of her estate.

Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara J. Pariente stated it well in her concurrence:

“… [T]his case does remind me of the old adage ‘penny-wise and pound-foolish.’  Obviously, the cost of drafting a will through the use of a pre-printed form is likely substantially lower than the cost of hiring a knowledgeable lawyer.  However, as illustrated by this case, the ultimate cost of utilizing such a form to draft one’s will has the potential to far surpass the cost of hiring a lawyer at the outset….

I therefore take this opportunity to highlight a cautionary tale of the potential dangers of utilizing pre-printed forms and drafting a [W]ill without legal assistance.”  Aldrich at *18.

Do not do the same.  Hire a lawyer so your family is not stuck in a tornado of litigation once you pass.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Specialized Estate Planning Techniques

KRH Website PictureThere are several areas of estate planning that provide unique opportunities to enhance tax and succession planning, while ensuring proper dissemination of net worth to appropriate individuals and/or entities.  Below are summaries of some of these specialized estate planning techniques:

INSURANCE

People should be aware that many estate planning situations involve the strategic use of insurance products.  Many attorneys and CPA’s often fail to see the connection between the dynamics of insurance and estate planning.  Individuals purchase millions of dollars worth of insurance each year for estate planning purposes, including liquidity, wealth replacement and business succession reasons.  Life insurance has relatively little market value during the life of the insured, therefore it is easy to get these policies isolated into an irrevocable life insurance trust.  Otherwise, the death benefit will be subject to the confiscatory estate tax.

DYNASTY TRUSTS

A Dynasty Trust is actually an irrevocable trust created by a trust agreement that may continue to create and operate trusts for many successive generations.  The trusts can continue passing assets from generation to generation without incurring transfer taxes.  Advantages of a Dynasty Trusts include estate tax-free compounding, creditor and divorce protection, per stirpital control, avoiding probate and potential income tax savings.

Most states have rules against holding property in trusts forever and limit the duration of the trust.  For example, Georgia allows trusts to continue for 90 years.  Fortunately, some states have abolished, enacted opt-out provisions or made other changes to their “rule against perpetuity” statutes allowing a person to create trusts to continue forever.  Currently, these states are Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia and Wisconsin. In addition to these states, Wyoming and Utah both allow Dynasty Trusts to last for 1,000 years, Florida allows  Dynasty Trusts to last for 360 years and Washington allows Dynasty Trusts to last for 150 years.

Ironically, a person does not have to live in one of these states to take advantage of its laws. The Dynasty Trust language would name a special trustee that resides in the jurisdiction so desired to hold and manage the trust assets, thereby giving the trust sufficient nexus to the state in order to utilize its laws.

FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

Family Limited Partnership (“FLP”) is a business entity set up to hold assets such as stock, real estate, etc.  Actually, in certain circumstances, limited liability companies (LLC’s) or limited liability limited partnerships (LLLP’s) may be the entity of choice, but the planning technique is generally referred as an FLP.

Transferring assets to an FLP can result in gift tax and estate tax savings because the taxpayer now owns a limited partnership interest rather than the underlying assets.  Limited partners, under common law, state law and the partnership agreement cannot participate in management or generally force liquidation of the partnership; therefore, the value of the partnership interest in an arms-length transaction is affected by a lack of control discount.  There also may be restrictions on transferability and other reasons that the limited partnership interest is worth less than a proportionate share of the underlying assets that are inside the partnership.  Therefore, gifts of partnership interest have become very popular ways of diminishing the size and growth of our clients’ estates.

Other advantages of FLP’s are the power to monitor wealth transfers to heirs, simplification of a person’s annual gifting, keeping assets in the family, providing creditor protection, protecting family assets from failed marriages, flexibility in the partnership agreement (as opposed to the irrevocable, unamendable trust), and flexibility in the management of the FLP. However, there are many formalities that must be followed in setting up FLP’s.  For example, the IRS requires significant non-tax purposes for the FLP.  There are a myriad of guidelines that should be followed, such as one should not transfer “personal” assets, like a personal residence, to an FLP.  FLP’s are a great tool to pass a client’s wealth on to the heirs during their lifetime, while  minimizing gift and estate taxes.

DEFECTIVE GRANTOR TRUSTS

A Defective Grantor Trust (“DGT”) is a term used for a trust that effectively removes property from a grantor’s estate for estate tax purposes, but not for income tax purposes.  A DGT is often used as a “freeze” technique, particularly for clients with large holdings of S corp stock.

S corp stock cannot be transferred to limited partnerships because a partnership is not a permitted S corp shareholder.  Yet, one of our objectives is often to try to shift any future appreciation in the S corp to a dynasty trust that has been set up for future generations.  A DGT is a permitted S corp shareholder. The grantor sells his/her interest in the S corp to the DGT (with dynasty provisions) in exchange for an installment note.  Because a grantor is considered owner of the DGT for income tax purposes, this sale is ignored for IRS purposes (no gain recognized).  We have now moved this asset out of grantor’s estate, except for the monies paid to him/her resulting from the installment note.

We have used a self-canceling installment note (“SCIN”) with an installment sale to a DGT.  This is obviously attractive since any remaining value of the installment note will go to zero if the grantor dies before the note has been completely paid.

GRAT’s, CRT’s & QPRT’s

Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (“GRAT”), Charitable Remainder Trusts (“CRT”) and Qualified Personal Residence Trusts (“QPRT”) are irrevocable trusts where the grantor transfers an asset to the trust in exchange for an annual payment (or use of the underlying property in the case of a personal residence trust) for a specified term of years (or for life in the case of a charitable trust).  Upon the expiration of the term the trust terminates and the assets pass to the named beneficiaries or charities.  Due to the current low interest and tax rate environment, techniques involving GRAT’s can be more attractive, while generally CRT’s and QPRT’s are not as popular, but they all are still used in particular situations.

On the other hand, CRT’s may be more popular for their income tax advantages.  Assets are first contributed to the CRT and then sold.  Generally, 100% of the proceeds are then available for alternate investments.  The CRT is a device that can be used to alleviate income taxes on the sale of capital assets because CRT’s are generally not subject to income taxes. Presently, the low interest rate environment maximizes the amount of charitable deduction that is available for gifts to CRT’s today (versus several years ago.  However, the capital gains rates have generally been reduced to 15% making the avoidance of these lower rates less attractive.

A popular variety of the GRAT planning technique is the “Walton” GRAT.  This is a very short term GRAT used to remove appreciating property out of an estate with zero or minimal gift tax consequences.  The Walton GRAT sets up the payment to the grantor over a short period of time where the GRAT will exhaust most of the corpus within the trust.  Since, according to the IRS tables, the value returned to the grantor represents the entire value of the trust, the gift element (the remainder interest) is worth nothing for gift tax purposes.  However, the appreciation in the property that has occurred over that period of time is removed from the grantor’s estate.  A Walton GRAT is particularly useful if the value of the asset placed in the GRAT is a discounted asset, such as a limited partnership interest.  A limited partnership can make distributions to the GRAT during its term and allow payments back to the grantor, while having the limited partnership interest flow to dynasty trusts at the end of the GRAT’s term.

These are merely a few of the examples of the types of unique estate planning techniques available to estate planning clients.  It is important that clients, attorneys, accountants, trust officers, insurance agents and financial advisors become familiar with these techniques so they can be watchful and vigilant for opportunities where they may be appropriate.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Conservation Easements – Easy Tax Savings (Update)

Ian 1You may not be able to have your cake and eat it too, but you can own your land and donate it too.

Conservation easements allow a property owner to maintain ownership of his land while ensuring it will be preserved in perpetuity.  This allows a land owner to maintain private ownership of the land while also limiting development, essentially making a charitable donation and therefore receiving a tax deduction for the reduction in value under IRC sec. 170.

Although the landowner will maintain possession of the land, the conservation easement burdening the land is permanent and runs with the land, so the land can be transferred, but the conservation easement restrictions will always remain in place.

Why would you want to burden your land forever?  Besides the charitable aspect, a landowner can save a significant amount of real estate taxes, income taxes, and estate taxes with a conservation easement.  A landowner who places a conservation easement on his land can offset up to 30 percent of federal taxable income, and up to a six year carryover of any unused deduction.  Additionally, there are state tax credits in Georgia and many other states for conservation easements.

The amount deductible from tax will be the difference between the value of the property before the conservation easement and the value of the property after that conservation easement, which must be determined by a qualified appraiser.

The landowner grants the conservation easement to either a government unit or a charity and the contribution must be exclusively for “conservation purposes.”

The state of Georgia gives a dollar-for-dollar income tax credit for 25 percent of the fair market value of the donation, up to a maximum credit amount of $250,000.  It can be carried forward for 10 years.  Additionally excess credits can be sold to other taxpayers for cash.  However, there is a $5,000 application fee.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Which Comes First? Estate Planning or Exit Planning?

Mike_Hoffman_17I would like to share an excellent article with you written by Denis M. Brown from Pace Capital Resources, LLC.  It is from The Exit Planning Review newsletter, issue 256, dated May 7, 2013.  Which Comes First? Estate Planning or Exit Planning?

Sincerely,

Mike

 

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

 

Georgia Education Expense Tax Credit – Do Not Wait, Apply for Approval Now

Mary 1The Georgia Department of Revenue has already approved 50% of the $58M education expense tax credits allowed for 2014.  Last year all of the credit cap was approved by May 9, 2013.  It is expected that the entire 2014 credit cap will be met by the end of January 2014.

This tax credit is for contributions made to Georgia Student Scholarship Organizations.  These organizations provide scholarships for students to attend primary and secondary private schools.  The contribution is deductible on your individual federal income tax return as a charitable contribution, and a dollar for dollar tax credit is allowed to offset your Georgia income tax.  Taxpayers must apply for pre-approval in order to participate in this program.  Once the annual credit cap is met, no additional applications are approved.

For more information regarding this or any other tax planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Musings from the CEO (Fall 2013)

Mike_Hoffman_17Here’s a dire prediction. You will remember 2013 as the year your taxes really went up! There has been a perfect storm of tax law changes that take effect in 2013, combined with the expiration of a number of recession tax relief measures, and the general prognosis that earnings and investment income are finally moving up in 2013 and into 2014.

In 2011 and 2012, those of you with earned income noticed a reduction in your Social Security withholding from 6.2% to 4.2%. That reduction is gone for 2013. You will also notice a Medicare tax increase of .9% that kicks in on earned income for those married taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income in excess of $200,000 for single taxpayers and $250,000 for married filing joint. This was part of Obamacare.

Also related to Medicare is a new Obamacare tax on net investment income, which includes capital gains (even taxable gain on the sale of a personal residence) of an additional 3.8% for those individual taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of over $200,000 and married taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of over $250,000.

The personal exemption phase outs (PEP) were eliminated during the recession over the last several years, but come back for 2013. This means that the deduction you would normally get for personal exemptions is phased out again, starting for those with adjusted gross income of over $250,000 for individual taxpayers or $300,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

Similarly, the limitations on itemized deductions, which had been suspended over the last several years, come back with a vengeance in 2013. These so-called Pease limitations reduce your itemized deductions up to 80% starting with individual taxpayers with adjusted gross income exceeding $250,000 or married taxpayers with adjusted gross income of over $300,000.

The threshold or floor for deducting medical expenses has been increased by 33 1/3% for 2013. In 2012, qualified medical expenses in excess of 7½% of adjusted gross income were deductible as an itemized deduction, and that threshold/floor has been increased to 10% for 2013.

Tax rates in general have gone up as a result of legislation taking effect in 2013. The top individual income tax rate has increased from 35% to 39.6%. The dividends and capital gains tax rate has increased by 1/3 from 15% in 2012 to 20% in 2013.

The Social Security wage base increased from 2012 to 2013 up to $113,700. That is the amount of earned income which is subject to the Social Security tax of 6.2% for an employee or 12.4% on earnings considered as from self employment.

What does all this mean? Tax rates on earned income have increased from potentially 52.1% (46.1% federal income tax, social security, Medicare, and 6% Georgia) to 61.8% (55.8% federal income tax, social security, Medicare, Obamacare and 6% Georgia). That’s 18.6% increase, and that’s the best scenario. Dividends and capital gains tax has increased 41.9%, from 21% (15% federal, 6% Georgia) to 29.8% (20% federal, 3.8% Obamacare, 6% Georgia).

Primarily, it means get your year-end planning done soon to mitigate any surprises. The need and the benefit of accelerating deductions or deferring income could be the most significant you have ever witnessed. Caution is advised to determine if you are in an alternative minimum tax situation, as this will have a significant effect on some year-end tax maneuvers that you might employ.

Examine your withholding and estimated payments to determine that you have eliminated or minimized any under-payment penalty. Explore the use of a plethora of state tax credits that are available, particularly in Georgia, to pay your state taxes. This could result in saving anywhere from 10% to 40% of your state tax liability, combined with the elimination of any potential under payment penalties.

Most tax preparers have software available to run a mock-up of your 2013 tax returns. This could come in handy to guide you as to whether it is advisable for you to accelerate certain deductions, harvest some capital losses to offset capital gains, convert traditional IRA assets to Roth IRAs, or confirm that your judgment to do nothing is rational.

In addition to being a full service law firm, Hoffman & Associates maintains a stand-alone tax practice area dedicated to the preparation and filing of all types of tax returns. Please do not hesitate to contact me or any of us if we can arrange to assist you in achieving some significant income tax savings for 2013.

For more information regarding this or any other estate or tax planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Wealth Transfer Strategies

Kim 1Wealth transfer strategies are at the core of our business.  This recent article featured in Business Week  is an excellent example of various wealth transfer strategies used by billionaire families.  You don’t have to be the Waltons to benefit from such strategies, so let us help you incorporate these strategies into your estate plan today.

How Wal-Mart’s Waltons Maintain Their Billionaire Fortune

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

 

 

 

 

The 2013 Medicare Surtax: What You Need to Know

The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 have ushered in new income tax provisions which become effective in 2013.  One of the new provisions is the 3.8% Medicare surtax on an individual’s Net Investment Income.  This tax is one of the funding provisions for the new health care legislation, known as Obamacare.  The surtax will impact high income taxpayers who have a modified adjusted gross income in excess of specific thresholds.

FIRST OF ALL, WHO IS A “HIGH INCOME” INDIVIDUAL?  WILL I BE SUBJECT TO THIS TAX?

Individuals will be subject to the tax if they have any amount of net investment income and their modified adjusted gross income (“MAGI”) for the year is greater than the following threshold amounts:

  •   Married filing jointly                                              $250,000
  •   Married filing separately                                        $125,000
  •   Single or head of household                                   $200,000

HOW IS THE TAX CALCULATED?

The 3.8% tax is calculated on the lesser of (1) your net investment income or (2) your MAGI in excess of the threshold amount.  Some common types of investment income are: interest (excluding tax exempt interest), dividends, capital gains, rental income (if you are not a real estate professional) and passive income from partnership activities.

DOES THE TAX APPLY TO THE GAIN ON THE SALE OF MY PERSONAL RESIDENCE?  WHAT ABOUT A VACATION HOME OR INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE?

Net investment income only includes the net taxable gain from the sale of a personal residence, which is the gain in excess of $500,000 for married individuals and $250,000 for single individuals.    The entire net capital gain from the sale of a vacation home, investment property or rental real estate is included in investment income.

DOES THIS TAX APPLY TO TRUSTS?

The tax will apply to estates and trusts with undistributed net investment income and an adjusted gross income in the amount of $11,650 for 2013.

WHAT CAN I DO TO MINIMIZE THE IMPACT OF THE SURTAX?

The timing of transactions becomes a very important tax planning tool in avoiding or minimizing the impact of the 3.8% surtax.  This is especially true for sales transactions of stock, real estate and other investments.  The current year tax impact of net investment income and other gains and losses should be reviewed in order to minimize the tax.

Other potential opportunities to minimize the surtax impact are:

  • Consider converting traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs.  This would reduce the MAGI in future years when distributions are taken from the accounts.
  • Investing in tax exempt bonds instead of taxable bonds.  The interest from the tax exempt bonds is excludable.
  • Harvesting capital losses to offset capital losses to reduce net investment income and MAGI.
  • Managing retirement plan distribution to maintain MAGI under the threshold amounts.

IS THE 3.8% SURTAX ON NET INVESTMENT INCOME THE ONLY MEDICARE SURTAX?  WHAT ABOUT EARNED INCOME?

No, there is also a .9% Medicare surtax on the wages and self-employment income of high income taxpayers.  This tax applies to earned income in excess of $200,000 for single filers, $250,000 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and $125,000 for married taxpayers filing separately.

For more information regarding tax planning, tax compliance and controversy, estate planning, or business law,  please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Musings From The CEO (Summer 2013)

Late last year many of our clients were scurrying around to do some last minute gifting.  The fear was that the $5,000,000 gift and estate tax exemption would fall back to $1,000,000; therefore, the opportunity to remove a significant amount of wealth from their taxable estates (and the future appreciation on such property) would be lost forever.  Ironically, or typically, after the 12th hour (at approximately 2 a.m. on the morning of January 1, 2013), Congress passed a new tax law making the $5,000,000 exemption permanent and increasing the tax rate from 35% to “only” 40% (as opposed to the anticipated 55%).  Congratulations to those who completed these estate planning maneuvers, as their families will benefit for generations to come from their, albeit maybe last minute, action.

Under the heading “here we go again”, on April 10th, the Obama Administration published their annual wish list of 2014 revenue proposals.  Several of the provisions related to estate planning, including, are you ready for this, changing the estate and generation skipping transfer tax exemptions back down to $3,500,000, and the gift tax exemption to $1,000,000!  The proposal includes another increase in the tax rate to 45%.  Additionally, the Obama Administration proposes to limit and curtail the use of GRATs (Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts), the technique of gifting or selling assets to a grantor trust, limiting the duration of exemption from generation skipping transfer tax to 90 years (as opposed to unlimited dynasty trusts in some parts of the country), and requiring the reporting to the IRS of purchases of life insurance in excess of $500,000.  As President Reagan said so succinctly, “There you go again!”.

One message is clear.  For those of you that embarked on significant estate planning back in 2012 and prior, congratulations.  For those of you who did not, and who need it, giddy-up!

Enough about estate planning.  The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (which became law on January 2, 2013), and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“Obamacare”) both become effective in 2013. Therefore, we will be spending a lot more time doing income tax planning.  The classic strategies of maximizing your deductions, reducing ordinary income, trying to achieve long term capital gains versus ordinary income, accumulating tax exempt income, deferring taxes and offsetting income with losses all need to be reviewed and expanded.

For high income taxpayers, up to 80% of itemized deductions can be lost.  For high income taxpayers, tax rates will exceed 39.6%, and combined with state income taxes could easily exceed 50%.  For high income taxpayers, dividend and capital gains rates increased 1/3 from 15% to 20%.  For high income taxpayers, the personal exemptions will be phased out and there will be a Medicare surtax on investment income of 3.8% and on earned income of .9%.

Income taxes have taken a sharp increase, deductions are being reduced, and the level of your adjusted gross income is critical to proper planning.  Be prepared to immerse yourself into these new income tax matters between now and the end of the year. For a lot of us, the tax savings or costs will be very significant.

 

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

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