The 2013 Medicare Surtax: What You Need to Know

The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 have ushered in new income tax provisions which become effective in 2013.  One of the new provisions is the 3.8% Medicare surtax on an individual’s Net Investment Income.  This tax is one of the funding provisions for the new health care legislation, known as Obamacare.  The surtax will impact high income taxpayers who have a modified adjusted gross income in excess of specific thresholds.

FIRST OF ALL, WHO IS A “HIGH INCOME” INDIVIDUAL?  WILL I BE SUBJECT TO THIS TAX?

Individuals will be subject to the tax if they have any amount of net investment income and their modified adjusted gross income (“MAGI”) for the year is greater than the following threshold amounts:

  •   Married filing jointly                                              $250,000
  •   Married filing separately                                        $125,000
  •   Single or head of household                                   $200,000

HOW IS THE TAX CALCULATED?

The 3.8% tax is calculated on the lesser of (1) your net investment income or (2) your MAGI in excess of the threshold amount.  Some common types of investment income are: interest (excluding tax exempt interest), dividends, capital gains, rental income (if you are not a real estate professional) and passive income from partnership activities.

DOES THE TAX APPLY TO THE GAIN ON THE SALE OF MY PERSONAL RESIDENCE?  WHAT ABOUT A VACATION HOME OR INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE?

Net investment income only includes the net taxable gain from the sale of a personal residence, which is the gain in excess of $500,000 for married individuals and $250,000 for single individuals.    The entire net capital gain from the sale of a vacation home, investment property or rental real estate is included in investment income.

DOES THIS TAX APPLY TO TRUSTS?

The tax will apply to estates and trusts with undistributed net investment income and an adjusted gross income in the amount of $11,650 for 2013.

WHAT CAN I DO TO MINIMIZE THE IMPACT OF THE SURTAX?

The timing of transactions becomes a very important tax planning tool in avoiding or minimizing the impact of the 3.8% surtax.  This is especially true for sales transactions of stock, real estate and other investments.  The current year tax impact of net investment income and other gains and losses should be reviewed in order to minimize the tax.

Other potential opportunities to minimize the surtax impact are:

  • Consider converting traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs.  This would reduce the MAGI in future years when distributions are taken from the accounts.
  • Investing in tax exempt bonds instead of taxable bonds.  The interest from the tax exempt bonds is excludable.
  • Harvesting capital losses to offset capital losses to reduce net investment income and MAGI.
  • Managing retirement plan distribution to maintain MAGI under the threshold amounts.

IS THE 3.8% SURTAX ON NET INVESTMENT INCOME THE ONLY MEDICARE SURTAX?  WHAT ABOUT EARNED INCOME?

No, there is also a .9% Medicare surtax on the wages and self-employment income of high income taxpayers.  This tax applies to earned income in excess of $200,000 for single filers, $250,000 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and $125,000 for married taxpayers filing separately.

For more information regarding tax planning, tax compliance and controversy, estate planning, or business law,  please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Musings From The CEO (Summer 2013)

Late last year many of our clients were scurrying around to do some last minute gifting.  The fear was that the $5,000,000 gift and estate tax exemption would fall back to $1,000,000; therefore, the opportunity to remove a significant amount of wealth from their taxable estates (and the future appreciation on such property) would be lost forever.  Ironically, or typically, after the 12th hour (at approximately 2 a.m. on the morning of January 1, 2013), Congress passed a new tax law making the $5,000,000 exemption permanent and increasing the tax rate from 35% to “only” 40% (as opposed to the anticipated 55%).  Congratulations to those who completed these estate planning maneuvers, as their families will benefit for generations to come from their, albeit maybe last minute, action.

Under the heading “here we go again”, on April 10th, the Obama Administration published their annual wish list of 2014 revenue proposals.  Several of the provisions related to estate planning, including, are you ready for this, changing the estate and generation skipping transfer tax exemptions back down to $3,500,000, and the gift tax exemption to $1,000,000!  The proposal includes another increase in the tax rate to 45%.  Additionally, the Obama Administration proposes to limit and curtail the use of GRATs (Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts), the technique of gifting or selling assets to a grantor trust, limiting the duration of exemption from generation skipping transfer tax to 90 years (as opposed to unlimited dynasty trusts in some parts of the country), and requiring the reporting to the IRS of purchases of life insurance in excess of $500,000.  As President Reagan said so succinctly, “There you go again!”.

One message is clear.  For those of you that embarked on significant estate planning back in 2012 and prior, congratulations.  For those of you who did not, and who need it, giddy-up!

Enough about estate planning.  The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (which became law on January 2, 2013), and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“Obamacare”) both become effective in 2013. Therefore, we will be spending a lot more time doing income tax planning.  The classic strategies of maximizing your deductions, reducing ordinary income, trying to achieve long term capital gains versus ordinary income, accumulating tax exempt income, deferring taxes and offsetting income with losses all need to be reviewed and expanded.

For high income taxpayers, up to 80% of itemized deductions can be lost.  For high income taxpayers, tax rates will exceed 39.6%, and combined with state income taxes could easily exceed 50%.  For high income taxpayers, dividend and capital gains rates increased 1/3 from 15% to 20%.  For high income taxpayers, the personal exemptions will be phased out and there will be a Medicare surtax on investment income of 3.8% and on earned income of .9%.

Income taxes have taken a sharp increase, deductions are being reduced, and the level of your adjusted gross income is critical to proper planning.  Be prepared to immerse yourself into these new income tax matters between now and the end of the year. For a lot of us, the tax savings or costs will be very significant.

 

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.