Estate Planning for Women

Women are a powerful financial force in today’s economy as they independently earn, manage, and distribute more wealth than ever before.  That’s why at Hoffman & Associates we  feel it’s important for women to take control of their long term financial security and develop a proper estate plan.  A successful estate plan is one that helps protect and preserve your wealth, gives you control over financial matters, ensures children and elders are taken care of, and honors your strong charitable passions.

Today, women face many challenges whether married, divorced, single or widowed, including a possible lack of financial know-how, lower lifetime wages and compensation, and greater responsibility for caretaking of children and elders.  Why are women unique when it comes to estate planning?  First, because women generally outlive men by five to seven years, and the average age of a widow is merely 56 years young.  Some of these single women are faced with managing thousands and even millions in assets without ever balancing a checkbook.  For single working women, compensation is also a major obstacle as women tend to earn less over their lifetime as compared to men and many take time off during child-bearing years, which may affect social security and pension benefits.   Another challenge unique to women is their tendancy to be the main caregivers in the family, making it critical to develop a comprehensive plan for the care of minor and special needs children, as well as elderly parents.  Finally, women generally harbor more charitable inclinations than men making it a priority for them to consider philanthropy and giving as part of their estate plan.

Here is a  checklist women can use in developing a successful estate plan:

  • Become educated in the importance of tax planning, know the current tax laws, become familiar with exclusions and how to take advantage of them, investigate advanced estate planning tools and techniques, including trusts, gifting, and college savings plans.
  •  Create an itemized list of all property and debts, including, but not limited to, insurance policies, securities, bank accounts, real estate, jewelry and artwork, business interests, pension plans, IRAs, and other retirement benefits.
  •  Consult with appropriate advisors (estate planning attorney, CPA, financial advisor) and execute a Will to direct the disposition of your estate, designate who should be in charge, simplify probate, and name guardians for minor children.
  •  Consider a Trust for the protection of children and assets and to reduce the tax liability (income, gift and estate).
  •  Get general powers of attorney and advanced directives for healthcare in place.
  •  Create a viable plan to manage and preserve your estate, keeping in mind the changing exemption limits for passing assets.  Currently the permanent estate and gift tax exemption is $5,250,000.
  •  Consider having adequate life insurance in place to pay taxes if necessary and to help preserve your family’s lifestyle by paying for children’s education, mortgage expenses, taxes or other needs after your death.
  •  Record where a safe deposit box is located and maintain all important documents in an organized manner.  Maintain a written list of all current advisors and keep it with your  list of property and debts.
  •  Provide instructions regarding your funeral wishes and any prepaid funeral plans to whomever may be involved in making such arrangements.
  •  Consider charitable transfers to accomplish your estate planning goals. A charitable remainder trust, charitable lead trust, charitable gift annuity or outright gifts to any number of charities.
  •  If you are a business owner, plan for your business’ succession, so you are deciding who will manage your entity during illness, disability, or after death.

 

Although some women feel uncomfortable taking on financial responsibility for their  future and that of their heirs, we strongly urge every woman, whether married, single, divorced or widowed to take a careful look at their financial situation and plan accordingly. Married women should ensure their estate plan coincides with that of their husbands to adequately take advantage of tax considerations.  And since married women are more likely to outlive their husbands, they must be prepared to ultimately be responsible for the protection and distribution of all assets.  For many working women, their main concerns include retirement planning and long term financial security, guardianship for minor children, caretaking for elderly parents, lowering tax liability, and ensuring assets remain in the family bloodline. We encourage all women to consult with professional advisors to ensure adequate financial and estate plans are in place while also incorporating lifetime goals and wishes.  Hoffman & Associates has created specialized estate planning services  for women designed to address these specific needs.  For more information on our targeted services, please visit www.hoffmanestatelaw.com.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose.  The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only.  Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services.  Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Opportunities to Take Advantage of Before Its Too Late

Tax laws are changing at the end of this year.  Take advantage of these opportunities before it’s too late.

Estate Tax Savings’ Techniques:

Gifting:  Use your $5,120,000 gift tax exemption.  Next year, the exemption is scheduled to be reduced to $1,000,000.  If you don’t use the exemption, you could lose it, and there is little downside as long as you don’t need the assets for future sustenance.

Spousal Access Trusts: Create spousal access trusts to use all or a portion of your gift tax exemption.  Your gift tax exemption can be used in a way that still allows you to provide for your spouse.

Valuation Discounts: Utilize valuation discounts for lack of marketability and lack of control. Gift hard to value or fractional interests in property.  By doing so, you can leverage your $5.12 million dollar exemption to remove even more property from your estate.  These valuation discounts for family owned assets and businesses are under scrutiny by the IRS and Congress.  If you wait too long, the law might change and you may lose the opportunity to leave more to your children and grandchildren.

Intra-Family Loans: Make intra-family loans. Interest rates are at all time lows.  By loaning money to trusts for the benefit of your children and grandchildren, you can remove virtually all of the appreciation on the loaned funds from your taxable estate, while knowing the principal is still there and can be paid back should you end up needing it.

Income Tax Savings’ Strategies:

Make Distributions: Make dividend payments from C corporations to take advantage of the current 15% tax rate. Next year, the rate is scheduled to go back up to ordinary income tax rates, and the new Healthcare Surtax could apply in certain circumstances making the highest effective tax rate on dividends 43.4%. That is almost a 200% increase in the tax rate on dividends.

Harvest Capital Gains: Sell appreciated assets now rather than next year.  The current capital gains rate of 15% is scheduled to rise to 20% next year and with the Healthcare Surtax, the highest effective tax rate on capital gains will be 23.8% in 2013.  That’s almost a 60% increase in the tax rate.

Charitable Deductions: Contribute to charities now, when the benefit is 35 cents on the dollar. Proposed legislation will reduce the deduction to 28 cents on the dollar next year.  Consider donor advised funds and private foundations that will allow you to have some control after the gift is made.

Fund 529 Plans: 529 plans are a great way to save for college.  Growth is tax free, and distributions are tax free if used to pay for qualified tuition and living expenses.  You can use up to 5 years worth of annual exclusion gifts in one year – that’s $65,000 per child in one year ($130,000 from a married couple), without using any of your lifetime gift exemption.  Act now because Congress may act to curb, reduce, or make the requirements more restrictive.

 

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and  compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose.  The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only.  Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services.  Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Annual and Lifetime Gifts

Gifting can play an important role in reducing estate tax exposure.  A gift is the transfer of real and personal property such as real estate, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, equipment, livestock, or cash, to beneficiaries before your death.  Gifting  removes all future appreciation on the gifted property from the taxable estate.   It can also accomplish income tax savings during life by shifting income producing property from one family member to another who is in a lower tax bracket.

The lifetime gift exemption for 2012 is set at $5.12 million dollars. However, it is scheduled to be reduced to $1 million dollars in 2013 unless Congress acts.  If you don’t use the current gift tax exemption, you could lose it.

In addition to your lifetime exemption, each donor may give $13,000 this year ($14,000 beginning in 2013)  per person, without any gift tax consequences.   To qualify for the annual exclusion, the gift must be a present interest gift (rather than a future interest).   Annual exclusion gifts can be outright or in trust.

Assume that a husband and wife have two children, each of whom is married, and each of whom has two unmarried children. This couple could give away a total of $208,000 this year without using up any part of their lifetime exemption. (Each parent could give $13,000 to each child, each child-in-law, and each grandchild, for a total of eight individual recipients, or $104,000 of gifts for the husband and $104,000 of gifts for the wife.  In 2013, each parent may gift an additional $1,000 per recipient.)

A gift will qualify for the $13,000 annual exclusion only if it is a gift of a “present interest.” Generally, this means that the (current year) gift must be made outright to the recipient, or (in the case of a person under age 21) to a Custodianship under the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act, or to certain kinds of trusts (typically, a “Crummey Trust”.)   The “present interest” limitation may require that the asset given away be income-producing or currently salable by the recipient.

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and  compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose.  The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only.  Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services.  Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.