Tax Law Changes Make Estate Planning Tougher

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If the IRS has its way, one of our prime estate planning techniques will soon be obsolete.

Earlier this month, the Treasury Department released proposed regulations under Section 2704 of the Internal Revenue Code that will severely undermine valuation discounts, which are commonly used by us and other estate planners to reduce the value of assets that are gifted or sold pursuant to a client’s estate planning.

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No Kids? An Estate Plan is Still Important

hoffmankimcolorThere are certain times in life where the need for a proper estate plan is so clear, its like the wail of a newborn at 3AM.  How will that child be cared for if something happened to you?

But what if you do not have children?  The answer may not be as clear, but it is no less important.

If you do not specify in a proper Will or Trust to whom and how your want your assets disposed of at your death, the State will do so for you.  Generally, the State will find your closest heirs and divide your assets among them.  Sound ok since that’s where you would send your assets anyway?  Then you should know that intestate (without a will) probate proceedings tend to be much more costly and time consuming than proceedings with a properly drafted Will.  The urgency is even greater when you do not want your brother and his kids to inherit your assets.  To direct otherwise requires an estate plan.

An estate plan is more than just a will though.  A Healthcare Directive and a well-drafted Power of Attorney are key components to a basic estate plan.  A Healthcare Directive names someone to make medical decisions for you in the event you cannot do so, it grants such person authorization to access your medical records under HIPAA, and it may include preferences for end of life care in the event of a terminal condition.  These directives make it much easier on loved ones to properly care for you in the event you can no longer communicate your medical preferences.  Anyone over the age of 18 needs a Healthcare Directive.  A parent no longer has automatic access to the medical records of their children after age 18, but so often an 18 year old is still under the care (financially, and otherwise) of their parent.

The last leg of the stool is a properly drafted General Power of Attorney.  These may be drafted to be “springing”; so that they spring into effect only upon incapacity.  Then, in the event of incapacity, you have previously named a trusted individual to manage your financial and personal affairs.  Should incapacity occur without a Power of Attorney in place, a court may appoint a Guardian or Conservator after an administrative process.

These Powers of Attorney and Healthcare Directives are essential documents, even for those individuals who do not feel a will is necessary because they have no children.  We, of course, still disagree with that notion, and we will be glad to discuss how each of these components of a good estate plan fit your specific needs.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

 

Revocable Living Trust

hoffmankimcolorAs Georgia based attorneys, we are very comfortable with the Will-based Estate plan.  Georgia probate courts are friendly and easy to work with, and Georgia law allows a Testator to waive the requirements of a bond, inventory and reporting to the court.  We cannot overlook the importance of a Revocable Living Trust, however, for those clients with out of state assets or where avoidance of probate is simply a desirable goal.

A Revocable Living Trust is, as its name implies, revocable or amendable at will by the Grantor, and living, which means it is funded and used during the lifetime of the Grantor as opposed to solely at death like a Will.  Generally, the Grantor funds the Living Trust with all of his or her assets, and the Grantor is generally the sole Trustee and the primary beneficiary of the Trust.  Though this all sounds somewhat circular, the Trust provides a very legitimate legal solution:  having the trust own all of your assets means you do not need a legal process to change title to those assets upon your passing.

For states like Florida, the Revocable Living Trust is a common estate planning document simply to avoid the probate process.  There, unlike Georgia, courts require the Personal Representative to post a bond, an inventory of the decedent’s assets must be provided to the court, and various accountings are also required to be filed.  The result is a generally a significantly more expensive and time-consuming probate process than in Georgia.   The Living Trust is not just for Florida residents though.  A Georgia resident owning a vacation condo in Florida will be subject to Florida’s probate process at death.  Thus, not only will the Estate be subject to Georgia probate proceedings, but it will need to file ancillary probate proceedings in Florida too.  This rule is applicable to ownership of assets in any other state, not just Florida, as each individual state has their own laws about transferring title at death.  Having a Living Trust own your out of state assets forecloses the necessity of multiple probate proceedings.

Another significant advantage to the Living Trust based Estate Plan is privacy.  Despite Georgia’s ‘friendly’ probate laws, the original Will must still be filed with the Court and it becomes public record.  This means anyone can review the terms of your Will at death.  In addition, all of your heirs at law are entitled to notice of the filing of the Will and a copy thereof.  For those that prefer their bequests remain private, or who perhaps have made an uneven distribution among their beneficiaries, the Living Trust may be a better choice.  A Living Trust can even help avoid a Will contest where certain heirs may be left out of an inheritance.

Revocable Living Trusts can also be significantly beneficial to a Grantor who becomes incapacitated.  Incapacity proceedings are becoming some of the most common probate court proceedings as people live longer but do not necessarily have all of their faculties.  When you form and fund a Living Trust, you name a successor Trustee to take over management of the Trust assets upon either your death or incapacity, again, entirely skipping the court process for doing so.  This provides a seamless, and immediate, transition of control from you to someone else in the event you can no longer manage your affairs.  And, it is a person of your choosing.  Your Trust document can even be very specific as to who and how you are determined to be incapacitated, thus giving you a great amount of control even where you would no longer have the ability to have such control.

The key to an effective Living Trust is fully funding the trust.  Funding the trust is legally transferring title to all of your assets to the Trustee of the Trust.  There are no tax consequences to such transfer as the trust is revocable, the IRS ‘looks through’ the trust and treats the assets as though they were still yours for income and transfer tax purposes.  Funding is accomplished by changing the title on bank accounts and investment accounts and recording deeds to real property.  Your attorney should go through specific funding instructions with you after a detailed analysis of your assets.

Finally,  a Living Trust will contain all of the testamentary decisions and dispositions of a Will, including trusts as needed for the surviving spouse and descendants, charitable bequests and other gifts you want made upon your passing.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

Donald Sterling and the L.A. Clippers: There’s Even More to the Story

Kim NewDonald Sterling was the controlling owner of the L.A. Clippers who made racially insensitive comments that went viral earlier this year.  After a hefty fine from the NBA, a lifetime ban, and a threat to force him to sell his controlling interest, Mr. Sterling, at age 80, still refused to sell his ownership interest in the team.  However, it was not the NBA that forced the sale of the team, it was his wife, Rochelle Sterling (“Shelly”), and the interplay of their estate plan that forced the sale and turned this scenario akin to a made-for-TV movie.

The Sterlings, California residents, created a lifetime revocable trust and funded it with all of their assets, including a controlling stake in the Clippers.  Both of the Sterlings were Co-Trustees and primary beneficiaries.  The revocable trust is the core document of an estate plan in many states, including California.  It controls assets during a person’s lifetime and manages the disposition of those assets at death without the need for the probate process.  As Co-Trustees, Donald and Shelly made decisions jointly with regard to their assets.

About the same time as the racial comments came to light, Shelly had Donald evaluated by two doctors for a determination of his mental capacity.  The doctors concluded Donald indeed suffered from diminished cognitive ability and was exhibiting signs of Alzheimer’s disease.  Pursuant to the Sterling’s revocable trust agreement, Donald could no longer serve as Co-Trustee with such diminished capacity, leaving Shelly as the sole Trustee with sole power to administer the trust’s assets.

Shelly negotiated the sale of the Clippers to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer for $2 billion, despite the protests from Donald.  Donald sued to enjoin the sale and sought damages from Shelly and the NBA.  He argued that he had the proper capacity to remain Trustee, and that Shelly failed to follow the proper protocol in his medical evaluation; therefore, she was not sole Trustee and did not have authority to sell the Clippers

The dispute went to Probate Court in California where the Judge heard arguments as to whether Donald was properly removed as Co-Trustee based on his mental capacity and whether Shelly had authority to sell the Clippers under the terms of the Trust agreement.  In late July, the Probate Court Judge ruled entirely in favor of Shelly and held the sale of the Clippers could proceed even if Donald appealed the ruling.  The Judge dismissed the claim that the capacity argument was merely a scheme by Shelly to sell the Clippers.

This case received a lot of attention for Donald Sterling’s racially charged comments, but the case also deserves a lot of attention for highlighting the issues of incapacity and estate planning.  As the population ages, reports of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of diminished mental capacity are on the rise.  Planning for someone else to manage your personal and financial affairs in the event of such illnesses or accident is a crucial part of an effective estate plan.  Who you choose to act on your behalf and how it is determined that you are “incapacitated” are equally important.  Although the events surrounding the sale of the Clippers were not as Donald and Shelly likely anticipated when creating their Revocable Trust, the Trust functioned exactly how it was intended.  Upon the death or incapacity of either Donald or Shelly, the survivor or remaining Trustee would serve as sole Trustee and continue to manage their joint assets, no court intervention needed.

A General Durable Power of Attorney and a Healthcare Power of Attorney or Directive are two key documents that plan for incapacity.  Without these in place, a time-consuming and costly court action will be required to name a Guardian or Conservator to manage the affairs of someone who is incapacitated.

Talk to your estate planning attorney about getting these documents in place for your family.  If you already have Powers of Attorney, give them a quick review, and make sure they still express your wishes and appropriately plan for the determination of incapacity.

 

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Even Young People Need Estate Planning

Kim 1“If I don’t have any assets, and I would want everything to go back to my parents anyway, why in the world do I need a Will at 20?”

As they pack their bags and stock up on under-bed boxes for college, the last thing on your college-age kids’ mind is an estate plan.  Even as they don the graduation cap and gown, an estate plan doesn’t even make a blip on their radar.  Perhaps the checklist for adulthood is replete with tasks more important than a Will, but a simple, even bare-bones estate plan should absolutely make the list.

Here’s a possible scenario:  your adult child has an accident and is hospitalized while in college.  You arrive at the hospital only to discover you are not entitled to see his medical records.  If he is unconscious and cannot give you verbal authorization, you’re in the dark, and may not even be able to participate in his health care decisions. Most parents are shocked when they hear this.

The good news is Health Care Powers of Attorney are simple, straightforward and standardized forms giving you the peace of mind you need to make informed decisions based on access to their full medical records.  Click on the following link to access the Georgia Advanced Directive for Healthcare.

After you get the Healthcare Directive in place, consider talking to your child about a Will.  The significance of such a document is often overlooked by a young adult.  Without a Will, a person’s assets will pass according to the State’s instruction.  While this may not be terrible, a parent who has transferred assets to their children may not want those assets back if such transfers were part of a larger estate plan.  In addition, young adults may have more financial assets than they think.  Custodial accounts constitute a significant sum of assets held by young adults.  Finally, consider a digital assets power in both a Will and a General Durable Power of Attorney for your young adults.  Vast amounts of information and access to accounts and other assets are now stored in the cloud.  Getting access to these digital files can be more difficult than you think without an explicit grant of power from your child in a written document.

When your kids come home for Thanksgiving with laundry that weighs more than your turkey dinner, have the conversation about getting these simple documents in place.  We are here to answer any questions you, or your young adult, may have.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Specialized Estate Planning Techniques

KRH Website PictureThere are several areas of estate planning that provide unique opportunities to enhance tax and succession planning, while ensuring proper dissemination of net worth to appropriate individuals and/or entities.  Below are summaries of some of these specialized estate planning techniques:

INSURANCE

People should be aware that many estate planning situations involve the strategic use of insurance products.  Many attorneys and CPA’s often fail to see the connection between the dynamics of insurance and estate planning.  Individuals purchase millions of dollars worth of insurance each year for estate planning purposes, including liquidity, wealth replacement and business succession reasons.  Life insurance has relatively little market value during the life of the insured, therefore it is easy to get these policies isolated into an irrevocable life insurance trust.  Otherwise, the death benefit will be subject to the confiscatory estate tax.

DYNASTY TRUSTS

A Dynasty Trust is actually an irrevocable trust created by a trust agreement that may continue to create and operate trusts for many successive generations.  The trusts can continue passing assets from generation to generation without incurring transfer taxes.  Advantages of a Dynasty Trusts include estate tax-free compounding, creditor and divorce protection, per stirpital control, avoiding probate and potential income tax savings.

Most states have rules against holding property in trusts forever and limit the duration of the trust.  For example, Georgia allows trusts to continue for 90 years.  Fortunately, some states have abolished, enacted opt-out provisions or made other changes to their “rule against perpetuity” statutes allowing a person to create trusts to continue forever.  Currently, these states are Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia and Wisconsin. In addition to these states, Wyoming and Utah both allow Dynasty Trusts to last for 1,000 years, Florida allows  Dynasty Trusts to last for 360 years and Washington allows Dynasty Trusts to last for 150 years.

Ironically, a person does not have to live in one of these states to take advantage of its laws. The Dynasty Trust language would name a special trustee that resides in the jurisdiction so desired to hold and manage the trust assets, thereby giving the trust sufficient nexus to the state in order to utilize its laws.

FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

Family Limited Partnership (“FLP”) is a business entity set up to hold assets such as stock, real estate, etc.  Actually, in certain circumstances, limited liability companies (LLC’s) or limited liability limited partnerships (LLLP’s) may be the entity of choice, but the planning technique is generally referred as an FLP.

Transferring assets to an FLP can result in gift tax and estate tax savings because the taxpayer now owns a limited partnership interest rather than the underlying assets.  Limited partners, under common law, state law and the partnership agreement cannot participate in management or generally force liquidation of the partnership; therefore, the value of the partnership interest in an arms-length transaction is affected by a lack of control discount.  There also may be restrictions on transferability and other reasons that the limited partnership interest is worth less than a proportionate share of the underlying assets that are inside the partnership.  Therefore, gifts of partnership interest have become very popular ways of diminishing the size and growth of our clients’ estates.

Other advantages of FLP’s are the power to monitor wealth transfers to heirs, simplification of a person’s annual gifting, keeping assets in the family, providing creditor protection, protecting family assets from failed marriages, flexibility in the partnership agreement (as opposed to the irrevocable, unamendable trust), and flexibility in the management of the FLP. However, there are many formalities that must be followed in setting up FLP’s.  For example, the IRS requires significant non-tax purposes for the FLP.  There are a myriad of guidelines that should be followed, such as one should not transfer “personal” assets, like a personal residence, to an FLP.  FLP’s are a great tool to pass a client’s wealth on to the heirs during their lifetime, while  minimizing gift and estate taxes.

DEFECTIVE GRANTOR TRUSTS

A Defective Grantor Trust (“DGT”) is a term used for a trust that effectively removes property from a grantor’s estate for estate tax purposes, but not for income tax purposes.  A DGT is often used as a “freeze” technique, particularly for clients with large holdings of S corp stock.

S corp stock cannot be transferred to limited partnerships because a partnership is not a permitted S corp shareholder.  Yet, one of our objectives is often to try to shift any future appreciation in the S corp to a dynasty trust that has been set up for future generations.  A DGT is a permitted S corp shareholder. The grantor sells his/her interest in the S corp to the DGT (with dynasty provisions) in exchange for an installment note.  Because a grantor is considered owner of the DGT for income tax purposes, this sale is ignored for IRS purposes (no gain recognized).  We have now moved this asset out of grantor’s estate, except for the monies paid to him/her resulting from the installment note.

We have used a self-canceling installment note (“SCIN”) with an installment sale to a DGT.  This is obviously attractive since any remaining value of the installment note will go to zero if the grantor dies before the note has been completely paid.

GRAT’s, CRT’s & QPRT’s

Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (“GRAT”), Charitable Remainder Trusts (“CRT”) and Qualified Personal Residence Trusts (“QPRT”) are irrevocable trusts where the grantor transfers an asset to the trust in exchange for an annual payment (or use of the underlying property in the case of a personal residence trust) for a specified term of years (or for life in the case of a charitable trust).  Upon the expiration of the term the trust terminates and the assets pass to the named beneficiaries or charities.  Due to the current low interest and tax rate environment, techniques involving GRAT’s can be more attractive, while generally CRT’s and QPRT’s are not as popular, but they all are still used in particular situations.

On the other hand, CRT’s may be more popular for their income tax advantages.  Assets are first contributed to the CRT and then sold.  Generally, 100% of the proceeds are then available for alternate investments.  The CRT is a device that can be used to alleviate income taxes on the sale of capital assets because CRT’s are generally not subject to income taxes. Presently, the low interest rate environment maximizes the amount of charitable deduction that is available for gifts to CRT’s today (versus several years ago.  However, the capital gains rates have generally been reduced to 15% making the avoidance of these lower rates less attractive.

A popular variety of the GRAT planning technique is the “Walton” GRAT.  This is a very short term GRAT used to remove appreciating property out of an estate with zero or minimal gift tax consequences.  The Walton GRAT sets up the payment to the grantor over a short period of time where the GRAT will exhaust most of the corpus within the trust.  Since, according to the IRS tables, the value returned to the grantor represents the entire value of the trust, the gift element (the remainder interest) is worth nothing for gift tax purposes.  However, the appreciation in the property that has occurred over that period of time is removed from the grantor’s estate.  A Walton GRAT is particularly useful if the value of the asset placed in the GRAT is a discounted asset, such as a limited partnership interest.  A limited partnership can make distributions to the GRAT during its term and allow payments back to the grantor, while having the limited partnership interest flow to dynasty trusts at the end of the GRAT’s term.

These are merely a few of the examples of the types of unique estate planning techniques available to estate planning clients.  It is important that clients, attorneys, accountants, trust officers, insurance agents and financial advisors become familiar with these techniques so they can be watchful and vigilant for opportunities where they may be appropriate.

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Wealth Transfer Strategies

Kim 1Wealth transfer strategies are at the core of our business.  This recent article featured in Business Week  is an excellent example of various wealth transfer strategies used by billionaire families.  You don’t have to be the Waltons to benefit from such strategies, so let us help you incorporate these strategies into your estate plan today.

How Wal-Mart’s Waltons Maintain Their Billionaire Fortune

For more information regarding this or any other estate planning concern, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

 

 

 

 

Sopranos Star’s Will Creates Windfall for IRS

James Gandolfini, the actor best known for his years as Mob boss, Tony Soprano, on HBO’s The Sopranos, died of a massive heart attack at age 51 in June.  The actor’s unexpected death leaves estate planners wondering if Mr. Gandolfini had any legal advice when making his Last Will and Testament, as the largest stakeholder of his estate will be the U.S. Government.

Gandolfini’s Will leaves 80% of his estate to be split equally among his two sisters and his infant daughter.  The remaining 20% is payable to his wife. Though a formal inventory is not due to be filed in the New York Courts until later this year, most estimate Gandolfini’s estate to be worth approximately $70 million.  That sounds like everyone gets a nice piece of the pie, but the government gets first bite.  The New York and U.S. government’s combined share is up to 55%, meaning the IRS could get approximately $25 million.  While Gandolfini’s wife’s 20% share is not subject to such taxes, her portion is determined after taxes are paid, leaving her with about $9,000,000.

The IRS’ share is to be paid in cash, and it is due within 9 months of death.  Gandolfini, like many wealthy celebrities, has mostly illiquid assets.  So, his family will likely be forced to sell certain assets to meet this tax liability.

The lesson here is that tax planning could have saved the Gandolfini family millions.  Assets pass tax free to spouses, so there were ample planning opportunities for a marital trust.  Gandolfini could have taken advantage of gifting strategies during his lifetime to reduce the size of his taxable estate.  A Revocable Trust could have been created to avoid the public knowing these details of his estate plan.  And, the property left to his infant daughter could have been placed in trust so she does not receive her entire inheritance in one lump sum upon attaining age 21.

 Alas, we are only left to wonder if this estate plan meets Gandolfini’s wishes.  With such a disproportionate amount of his estate being distributed to the IRS versus his wife and two children, it leaves an unsettling feeling that he just didn’t get the right plan in place before his untimely death.

For more information regarding estate planning, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com, call us at 404-255-7400 or send us an email.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

Hoffman Extended Family Services

At Hoffman & Associates, we strive to provide excellent service to our clients by ensuring they preserve and protect their legacy for generations to come.  By having a proper estate plan in place, you can be certain that loved ones are well taken care of, the risk of paying high taxes is  minimized, and the administrative burden of probate is less.

In that light, we are excited to announce Hoffman Extended Family Services.  The new permanent estate tax laws enacted in 2013 have given estate planning practitioners quite a bit more flexibility, and even an element of simplicity, in drafting proper estate plans for our clients.  We feel that many of your children, grandchildren, friends and neighbors could benefit from a simple, but professionally prepared estate plan.

We are offering a simple estate plan, which includes a Last Will and Testament, General Power of Attorney and Georgia Advance Healthcare Directive for a married couple, to your family and friends for only $950.00.  This special price is limited to simple Wills, without trusts, but will ensure your loved ones receive peace of mind knowing their assets are protected and there is a professional estate plan in place.  We will meet with each client individually and draft an estate plan that fits their needs.

If you have friends or family that can benefit from our services, please have them contact us at 404-255-7400 or visit us online at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com.  As always, should you have any questions concerning your estate plan, do not hesitate to give us a call or send us an email.

For more information regarding estate planning, business law or tax controversy and compliance, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

 

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

The Life Insurance Question

As Estate Planners, we often get asked about life insurance.  Do I need it?  How much should I buy?  Should I buy term or permanent coverage?  Which is better:  whole life, variable life or universal life?  Life Insurance is valuable for many reasons, and in our practice, we very often see it used (and recommend it!) for liquidity purposes in taxable estates, for buy-sell arrangements in closely held entities, for funding the education of future generations, equalization of inheritances, or simply income for the surviving family members.  You should have a trusted insurance professional in your team of advisors to ensure your particular situation is adequately addressed.  Gary Bottoms, CLU, ChFC of The Bottoms Group, LLC provides us with a helpful analysis of term insurance versus the various forms of permanent insurance.  We have included his article here as an excellent resource and starting point for answering your life insurance questions.  Give us a call to see where life insurance fits into your estate plan.

 

Term vs Perm Insurance White Paper by Gary Bottoms

 

Article used with permission by Gary T. Bottoms, The Bottoms Group, LLC

 

For more information on estate planning, general business, and tax law, please visit the Hoffman & Associates website at www.hoffmanestatelaw.com or call us at 404-255-7400.

In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this article is not to be considered a “covered opinion” or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for IRS audit, tax dispute, or any other purpose. The information contained herein is provided “as is” for general guidance on matters of interest only. Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys-at-Law, LLC is not herein engaged in rendering legal, accounting, tax, or other professional advice and services. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a competent professional advisor.

 

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